Dinosaurs of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Recently I visited Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for the second time. Whenever I’m traveling, I ask my cab or shuttle driver, “If I can only visit one attraction in your city before I leave, where do you suggest I go?” On this particular Saturday, it was raining like crazy, and so my hotel shuttle driver Zach suggested an indoor activity: the Carnegie Museum of Art and Natural History. I am always agreeable to a museum visit!

I could only spend about three hours at the museum (tragedy!), and so I decided to skip the art side and spend my entire visit on the natural history side. These are grand museums, founded in the late 1800s by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. (The four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh are the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, the Carnegie Museum of Art, the Carnegie Science Center, and the Warhol.)

staircase in the Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History

They don’t build them like this any more.

Dinosaur at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Since it was a Saturday, there were a zillion kids racing down the hall to see the dinosaur skeletons. I joined them!

dinosaur at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History

This is camptosaurus aphanoecetes, an herbivore

dinosaur at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History

This one is called Protoceratops andrewsii. How cool would it be to have a dinosaur named after you?

Observation deck at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History

And to put the size of these skeletons in perspective, I climbed to the third-floor observation platform and snapped a pic. Check out the library!

Paleolab at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Research is ongoing at the Carnegie, and visitors can watch scientists in action at the Paleolab.

a fossil in the Paleolab at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Here are some fossils being prepared…

A fossil in the Paleolab at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History

a scientist at work in the Paleolab at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History

And a scientist at work.

Thanks, Zach, for the great recommendation! This museum is a must-see if you’re a natural history fan.

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15 comments

    • You know, I really enjoyed Pittsburgh. This was my second trip. It IS fascinating. And the city is developing all along the riverfront…it’s a fun place! I picked up a book on the industrialists, but I haven’t started it yet.

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  1. Pingback: Carnegie Museums. Pittsburgh Giving Day: October 3. Support Museums | Yareah Magazine. Arts and writing

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